Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Photograph review

Beverly Lewis' new novel "The Photograph" is a stand alone novel, but ties in to several of her other novels with characters and location.  Frona, Eva, and Lily are three orphaned sisters of young adult age.  They are single and Amish.  The combination of these four characteristics puts them in a rather tight spot.  Their brother has inherited the house they are currently living in and that means they need to go.  However, they cannot just move out and get jobs.  So they are on the look out to marry fast or in Lily's case, a desperate measure of leaving the People.  Lily strikes out on her own and leaves the other sisters searching for her.  Jeb is an Ohioan carriage maker that finds the Little Women book that Lily has left on the train.  Following the clues, he begins to search for her as well.  However, things get tangled up when he mistakes Eva for Lily.
Beverly Lewis is by far the best Amish writer and can generally do no wrong when it comes to writing.  In this novel, I kept rooting for Lily to make her getaway since I felt she really had no other choice.  She was being tossed out on her ear and leaving the People seemed like a good way to make a life.  But when Lewis brings the characters full circle and shares the difficulties of leaving the Plain life, the reader starts to see a whole new side of things.  How do you live when you are trying to be something you are not?  Good book.  4 stars.  I received this book in exchange for an honest review from Bethany House Publishers.

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Mama's favorite Robertson

I knew Jep Robertson would be my favorite Robertson when he went cruising by the duck shop on a dolly saying "Hello, Clarice" and no one acknowledged him or even flinched.  I was cracking up.  I knew I had picked the right one when in the book, "The Good, The Bad, and the Grace of God" he wrote that he had watched the entire series of X Files while he was supposed to be working.   This is the latest release of Duck Dynasty star books and it tells the story of Jep and Jessica Robertson.  Jep would be the baby; mama's favorite.  The book goes back and forth in telling with one chapter written by and telling the story of Jep and the other of Jessica.  Jessica's story tends to ramble, which she admits to doing during speeches.  However, when she tells the story of her first husband, she sticks to task and tells the story well.  I especially like how she takes ownership of her part in the story.  That is a story more young women need to hear and lesson they need to learn.  Jessica would make a great mentor.  Jep's story is told in a more disciplined orderly manner.  He tells of his trials in life.  There are several.  Sometimes I was thinking " I don't think I should know this", but I guess it is his story to tell.  Jep's writing is very clever and funny.  I think this dude is hilarious.  I received this book in exchange for my honest review from www.booklookbloggers.com

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

star crossed lovers

"'Til We Meet Again" by Ray & Betty Whipps with Craig Borlase is the true story of star crossed lovers in war-torn Europe during WWII.  The story is told with a narrative of Ray and his journey from his hometown to Navy Air School to Army infantry in France and eventually POW in Germany.  Betty's side of the story is told through letters home and to Ray.  Ray was injured while fighting and came to the hospital where Betty was nursing.  The two felt a kinship with their Christianity unity and fell in love.  When Ray recovered he was sent back to his unit and was almost immediately taken prisoner. 
This is an amazing story.  The writing is superb, the story amazing, and the reader will have difficulty tearing themselves away from the book.  I loved this; 5 stars!  I received this book in exchange for an honest review from Tyndale House Publishers. 

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Little Prince Noah

"The Prince who was Just Himself" is written by Silke Schnee and illustrated by Heike Sistig.  This is a children's story of Prince Noah's introduction to his royal family.  Noah is a bit different.  That's ok with some and not with others.  But he is full of love, wonder, and patience.  Prince Noah has Down's Syndrome.  When the kingdom is attacked by Scarface, Noah brings the villain to his knees by showing him love and compassion. 
This book is aimed at children, but as a read-to.  I really loved this book!  I feel it should be in every child's library.  It not only explains Down's Syndrome to a child in a way that can be understood, but also teaches tolerance as well.  The illustrations are wonderful and cheerful.  I received this book in exchange for an honest review from Handlebar Publishing. 

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Come Rain or Shine

"Come Rain or Shine" book 11 of the Mitford novels by Jan Karon tells the story of the wedding of Dooley and Lace, the constant duo of the previous novels.  The two are putting together a wedding, graduating from Vet School (Dooley), taking over a practice and farm, as well as adopting a 4 year old boy.  This seems like a lot and the two are handling it well.
This is the first of the Mitford books that I have read.  Though Karon did a good job of keeping the reader abreast of what had happened, should they not have read the rest of the series, it is still hard to catch up when the series is on book 11.  There were several times, that I had to either re-read or be confused for awhile till I figured out what was going on.  As a single book, the writing is good and easy to read.  The accents may be a little hard to pick out if you are a city slicker, but I liked them included.  Gave the characters a more personal touch.  I have heard from fellow bookaholics that the Mitford series is brilliant, so my recommendation would be to start at the beginning.  If you have already read the previous 10, than you better get started on "Come Rain or Shine!"  I received this book in exchange for a review from www.firsttoread.com

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Empire's End review

"Empire's End" or as it is sometimes called on sites "I, Paul"  by Jerry B Jenkins is the adult companion book to "I, Saul", a youth historical fiction about the Apostle Paul.  Though Paul wrote a huge chunk of the New Testament, little is known of his personal life.  In this fictional telling, Jenkins fills in the gaps starting with the horrors that Saul inflicted on the people of The Way and following him through his conversion and writings. 
The story starts off in an advanced writing style that might seem hard to follow for some, but the point is to catch up the reader with the politics of the times.  Following the Preamble, the writing takes a more readable fashion so that the reader can become more involved with the storyline.   Jenkins is one of the infamous duo who wrote "Left Behind" yet this is the first book of his I have read.  He is a brilliant writer, who writes with an intelligent fashion, yet can keep the reader interested without making it hard to understand. I  have always wondered how Christians found the 'turning a new leaf' of Paul to be authentic.  I don't think I would have believed him until he proved himself.  I don't think I would have forgiven him.  How many times have I lost something that could have been good because I wouldn't forgive?  He takes Paul's story and turns it into not only a thinker, but an adventure story.  I would recommend this to anyone, not just Christians as a good thriller.